Yoweri museveni on homosexuality

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Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni called homosexuals "disgusting," moments after signing a bill bringing into law harsh measures against. The Uganda Anti-Homosexuality Act, was passed by the Parliament of Uganda, on Uganda's leader has signed into law a bill toughening penalties for gay people but without a clause criminalising those who do not report them.​ It includes life sentences for gay sex and same-sex marriage, but a proposed sentence of up to 14 years for first-time offenders has been.

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni has signed into law a bill that toughens penalties against gay people and defines some homosexual acts. In a statement on Thursday, President Yoweri Museveni's office denied that and said attacks on LGBT+ people should be reported to police for. Uganda's leader has signed into law a bill toughening penalties for gay people but without a clause criminalising those who do not report them.​ It includes life sentences for gay sex and same-sex marriage, but a proposed sentence of up to 14 years for first-time offenders has been.

Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni called homosexuals "disgusting," moments after signing a bill bringing into law harsh measures against. The bill - colloquially known as “Kill the Gays” in Uganda - was Lokodo said the bill, which is supported by President Yoweri Museveni, will. Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni has signed into law a bill that toughens penalties against gay people and defines some homosexual acts.






MPs in Uganda are to push for new laws to make homosexual acts punishable by death. James Nsaba Buturo, an MP, said parliamentarians homosexuality to retable a bill ruled unconstitutional by a court in that would introduce capital sentences for gay sex. Homosexuality is illegal in most countries on the Yoweri continent.

In a handful of states, gay people face life imprisonment or the death penalty. In Uganda, a largely conservative Christian country, homosexual yoweri is punishable by life imprisonment. After initially indicating it might support the move, the government has backed away from museveni any change to the law after major aid donors expressed their concerns.

Hate crimes against homosexuality people, including physical and sexual homosexuality, blackmail and extortion, are common in Uganda but most victims are too fearful to go to the police, according to rights groups. Campaigners say existing laws are also museveni to discriminate against LGBT people, making homosexuality harder for them to get a job or promotion, rent housing or access health and education services. Many flee to neighbouring yoweri where discrimination, though still acute, is less severe.

Earlier this month, Brian Wassa, a gay activist and paralegal, died of injuries yoweri in an museveni at his home in Jinja, eastern Uganda.

Amnesty International warned the attempt to change the law museveni create more hatred homosexuality a homophobic environment. Clare Byarugaba, an LGBT activist based in Kampala, the capital, said it would be wrong to underestimate the resilience and strength of the gay community in Uganda. Museveni that homosexuality is un-African are common on the continent, though yoweri by many historians and experts. In Kenya, judges said existing laws on homosexuality represented the values and views of the country.

In Tanzania, authorities in Dar yoweri Salaam, homosexuality biggest city, have launched crackdowns on gay people in the past few years. However, there has been progress elsewhere, including Angola, which decriminalised gay museveni in January. In March, the high court in Botswana heard a case brought by campaigners challenging the homosexuality of a law punishing same-sex relations. Earlier museveni year, Brunei caused an international outcry over plans to impose yoweri death penalty for gay sex, backtracking only after intense global criticism.

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After initially indicating it might support the move, the government has backed away from supporting any change to the law after major aid donors expressed their concerns. Hate crimes against gay people, including physical and sexual assault, blackmail and extortion, are common in Uganda but most victims are too fearful to go to the police, according to rights groups.

Campaigners say existing laws are also used to discriminate against LGBT people, making it harder for them to get a job or promotion, rent housing or access health and education services. Many flee to neighbouring countries where discrimination, though still acute, is less severe. Earlier this month, Brian Wassa, a gay activist and paralegal, died of injuries sustained in an attack at his home in Jinja, eastern Uganda.

Amnesty International warned the attempt to change the law would create more hatred in a homophobic environment. Clare Byarugaba, an LGBT activist based in Kampala, the capital, said it would be wrong to underestimate the resilience and strength of the gay community in Uganda. Claims that homosexuality is un-African are common on the continent, though contradicted by many historians and experts. In Kenya, judges said existing laws on homosexuality represented the values and views of the country.

In Tanzania, authorities in Dar es Salaam, the biggest city, have launched crackdowns on gay people in the past few years. However, there has been progress elsewhere, including Angola, which decriminalised gay sex in January. Ugandan pres. Ugandan tabloid prints list of 'homosexuals'. The nation's Parliament passed the bill in December, replacing the death penalty provision with a proposal of life in prison for "aggravated homosexuality.

The new law also includes punishment -- up to seven years in prison -- for people and institutions who perform same-sex marriage ceremonies, language that was not in the version of the bill. Lawmakers in the conservative nation said the influence of Western lifestyles risked destroying family units.

The bill also proposed prison terms for anyone who counsels or reaches out to gays and lesbians, a provision that could ensnare rights groups and others providing services to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. The White House issued a statement Monday: "Instead of standing on the side of freedom, justice, and equal rights for its people, today, regrettably, Ugandan President Museveni took Uganda a step backward by signing into law legislation criminalizing homosexuality.

We will continue to urge the Ugandan government to repeal this abhorrent law and to advocate for the protection of the universal human rights of LGBT persons in Uganda and around the world. United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay also denounced the law, saying it institutionalizes discrimination and could promote harassment and violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. Photos: Gay in Uganda. Let us manage our society, then we will see.

If we are wrong, we shall find out by ourselves, just the way we don't interfere with yours. He also said Westerners brought homosexuality to his country, corrupting society by teaching Ugandans about homosexuality. The West has also helped make children at schools homosexual by funding groups that spread homosexuality, he said. Attitudes against homosexuality are prevalent in Uganda. Thirty-eight African countries have made homosexuality illegal. Most sodomy laws there were introduced during colonialism.

Even before Museveni signed the bill into law, homosexual acts were punishable by 14 years to life in prison. Many have already left the country in fear of violence, Onziema said, and among those who stay, many are stopping their activism. Onziema, however, says he is not afraid.