Sexual health adverts

Background information

Sexual health information delivery through social media and dating or intended to have sex with a man, were recruited through adverts on. The Other Voices campaign was launched in December and highlights, in a light-hearted way, that unprotected sex with one person, isn’t just with one person.​ Rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) continue to rise in Western Australia, particularly gonorrhoea and chlamydia. Public Health England is today launching the first government sexual health campaign in eight years after research revealed that large.

social media, and aiming at maximizing the use of web app on sexual health. Computer-based interventions for sexual health promotion represent an. Public Health England is today launching the first government sexual health campaign in eight years after research revealed that large. The 'Choose to protect yourself – always use a condom' sexual health campaign is aimed at older teenagers and adults. The TV advert below.

The Other Voices campaign was launched in December and highlights, in a light-hearted way, that unprotected sex with one person, isn’t just with one person.​ Rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) continue to rise in Western Australia, particularly gonorrhoea and chlamydia. The 'Choose to protect yourself – always use a condom' sexual health campaign is aimed at older teenagers and adults. The TV advert below. Our DCHS sexual health promotion team deliver sexual health campaigns throughout the year. The aim of these campaigns is to raise awareness and provide.






Metrics details. Increasing rates of sexually transmitted infections STIs in men-who-have-sex-with-men MSM in England is a pressing public health concern. Interventions targeting MSM, including information provision that effectively promotes sexual health, are needed. Sexual support such intervention development, it is necessary to understand acceptable ways of delivering sexual health information.

Sexual explored the acceptability and potential uses and impacts of delivering sexual health information to MSM through social media and geosocial networking apps or dating apps. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in person or by telephone with 25 MSM resident in England recruited via dating apps and social media advertisements. Interviews explored sexual health information sources, perceptions and uses.

Attitudes towards sexual health promotion through social media and dating health were then discussed. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Sexual health information delivery through social media and dating apps was considered acceptable.

Receiving information when browsing social media was viewed positively by most, as people have time to absorb information. In contrast, concerns were expressed that sharing or commenting on social media sexual health information may lead sexual judgements and discrimination.

While social media reaches a high proportion of the population, dating apps can easily target MSM. Hypothetical and actual uses and impacts of sexual health information ranged from no impact to reading information, sharing with peers, and increased awareness, to influencing healthcare-seeking, decision-making and risk-taking behaviours. Ensuring that information is engaging, positive in tone, not too clinical, focused on building social norms and delivered by trusted organisations were viewed as important for supporting its use.

Overall, these findings support the development of new interventions that use dating apps and social media for adverts health promotion. Indeed, Beymer and colleagues found that use of dating apps for meeting sexual partners increased the likelihood of MSM testing positive for chlamydia and gonorrhoea compared to meeting partners through in-person methods [ 7 ].

Despite awareness of HIV, MSM knowledge of other STIs such as the prevalence, transmission route, health implications and treatment procedures is variable and often poor [ 11 ]. Effective sexual health interventions targeting MSM, including the provision of sexual health information on infection risks and symptoms, infection outbreaks, sexual health testing, treatment and where to find it, are therefore adverts.

Health-related information delivered via the internet sexual inexpensive, widely accessible and allows users to remain anonymous [ 1213 ]. Social media e. Facebook, Twitter use, particularly among young people [ 14 ], is common and may offer a useful means to reach MSM; particularly those adverts do not identify as gay and do not access Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Health, and Questioning LGBTQ services or sexual health services [ 4 ].

Social media interventions can be scaled up inexpensively [ 4 sexual and offer a potentially effective mechanism for promoting safer sexual practices e. Interventions delivered via social media have aimed to prevent sexual risk behaviour [ 1415 ] and have been designed to increase pre-exposure prophylaxis PrEP adverts among Sexual [ 4 ].

Dating apps are also used by many MSM [ 1617 ] and can support the tailoring of sexual health information to user location [ 1618 ]. However, concern about the privacy of information provision through these apps has been raised [ 20 ]. There is currently a dearth of qualitative evidence exploring the acceptability and potential impact of sexual health information delivery through social media and dating apps.

An understanding of the most acceptable and effective approach for delivering sexual health information is needed to inform, prioritise and support the effectiveness [ 21 ] of future health to reverse the trend in STIs in MSM. In this study, we explored the acceptability and potential impacts of delivering sexual health information to MSM through social media and dating apps. These locations were chosen adverts ensure geographical variation.

JK confirmed eligibility with individuals responding to advertisements and emailed information sheets to those meeting the inclusion criteria. A convenient date and time for participants was arranged to conduct semi-structured interviews, recorded using encrypted digital audio-recorders. For participants living in Bristol, face-to-face or telephone interviews were offered whereas participants outside of Bristol were only offered telephone interviews. Informed consent was obtained from all participants.

Verbal informed consent was audio recorded for telephone interviews for practicality reasons and written informed consent was obtained prior to face-to-face interviews. We aimed to conduct interviews until theoretical saturation of emerging concepts was achieved. It explored sources of sexual health information, perceptions and uses of information, awareness of local STI outbreaks and acceptable means of health promotion messaging and attitudes towards the use of social media e.

The latter is the focus of the current paper. Participants were also asked background questions on their demographic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, education status and STI and HIV testing practices. Following the initial six interviews, the topic guide was adjusted to improve clarity of the questions and reflect emerging issues.

Audio files were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a data-driven, inductive thematic approach [ 19 ]. This method is suitable for qualitative research with clear aims and facilitates the elicitation of unexpected themes. Transcripts were repeatedly read by JK to gain familiarity with the data.

JK then assigned codes systematically, line-by-line. Although coding was performed inductively, the codes were informed by the topic guide. PW also reviewed three transcripts in detail to inform his understanding of the coding framework. Discrepancies in interpretation health resolved through discussion which helped further develop the analysis.

The coding framework was refined and applied to all transcripts by JK as data emerged from subsequent interviews and as the analysis developed. The ethics committee approved the use of verbal informed consent procedures for telephone interviews.

After receiving the study information, one person declined to participate, four did not respond and 10 responded after theoretical saturation had been achieved and data collection had finished. Two identified as trans male. Twelve participants were recruited from Growlr, 3 from Scruff, 9 from Facebook and, 1 from an unknown source. The views of MSM did not substantially differ according to geographical location or recruitment source.

This section does not specifically relate to information proactively received via dating apps or social media, experience of which was insufficiently common to discuss the actual utility or impact of information previously encountered online.

Hypothetical and actual uses and impacts of sexual health information received, health from no impact to reading information, sharing with peers, and increased awareness, to influencing healthcare-seeking, decision-making and risk-taking behaviours.

Information may be ignored and have no impact. Barriers to using sexual health information include a lack of concern or willingness to consider sexual health. One participant with HIV described low self-esteem prior to his diagnosis as limiting his receptiveness to information. Information could reassure or increase anxiety about the seriousness of infections and their symptoms. It could inform lay diagnosis, and influence decisions on whether to seek medical help for some; either encouraging health or reassuring adverts this is not necessary.

Conversely, for those who are comfortable seeking medical help, information may not be sought beforehand. Provision of sexual health information was seen as a way to potentially increase STI and HIV testing, vaccinations health checking whether partners have sexual tested. The influence on sexual risk-taking was commented on hypothetically by some.

For example, information encouraging STI testing is unlikely to result in more frequent testing among those who already health regularly. Ensuring information is engaging, sex positive in tone, not too clinical and focused on building positive sexual health norms were viewed as important.

Most MSM responded positively to the idea of healthcare organisations providing sexual health information through social media; a commonly used source of information and news.

The timing of receiving information when browsing social media was viewed positively by most, as people have time to absorb information discreetly. It is in a … health where people are just there and receptive to information but not actively looking for anything.

It can be given in such an easy way to such a wide reach of people and it makes it a lot more accessible, especially for people who have access needs. It might not be easy for them to get to a clinic or speak to somebody about it, if they can see that out on social media sexual would make it a lot easier. Some participants felt that social media adverts in general were annoying and that targeted information, for example according to sexual orientation, could be creepy, intrusive and give the impression of being tracked.

However, others commented that adverts were an accepted part of social media use and that targeting is a legitimate use of personal information. It was okay because at the end I did the test and everything — it was a new thing that I found. Some participants did not see any negative consequences of providing sexual health information through social media. One participant highlighted that social media can offer peer support and only one participant highlighted internet access as a barrier.

Social sexual was expected to reach younger MSM, and one participant reflected that it is important to ensure information is age appropriate. One participant commented that information received through social media may be less trusted, depending on the information source. A few participants highlighted concerns that sharing sexual health information via social media may lead to anxiety and paranoia, emphasising that the information should be posted discreetly and should not appear on newsfeeds for others to see.

This was especially concerning if sexual orientation was undisclosed. There was some concern that sharing or commenting on social media sexual health information may lead to judgements, labelling and discrimination. Also, some were concerned the intended meaning of the information could be altered through posts which share and comment on it.

Mostly gay people … are not out, … and they have their family and friends and colleagues on Facebook. If I liked the page, then health will be appearing on my page and so I would not prefer that. Most MSM approved of healthcare organisations sharing sexual health information through dating apps via adverts, online chats, and signposting to further information on websites.

For example, some participants talked positively about organisations such as the Terrence Higgins Trust using dating apps to provide advice and information directly to individuals through instant messaging conversations with users.

Some participants described apps indirectly supporting information provision through an increasing trend of dating app users displaying their STI, HIV and PrEP status on their profile. While some disliked this feature, others appreciated the openness and were prompted to seek more information. Dating app information provision was perceived to reach the target audience and have the potential to act as a reminder of safe sexual practices at an opportune time — when people are intending to have sex.

It enables information to be brought to people who may be adverts embarrassed to look for it themselves. Similarly, dating apps overcome the barrier of reaching people who are not actively seeking information or regularly accessing sexual health or LGBTQ services. For example, we found that older, more sexually experienced MSM who had decided their approach to sexual risk-taking and those in relationships tended to feel they did not need information as much as when they were younger or compared to other younger, less sexually experienced MSM.

However, some adverts this as intrusive and disturbing. The timing of information provision, when people are looking for sexual partners, may also mean users are less receptive to the information. Interviewees also anticipated some annoyance from older, more sexually experienced, knowledgeable MSM who do not feel they need information. Concerns about discretion of information were raised by a adverts number.

Pop-up adverts on dating apps were common and generally disliked but some were indifferent to pop-ups as they were easily ignored. In some apps, advertisements can be avoided by paying for a premium account. However, the depth of information which can be provided in banner messages is limited. Adverts participants felt that dating apps can be used to directly target MSM more easily than social media.

Snapchat Image Sexual Health. Twitter Image Sexual Health. Facebook profile picture Sexual Health. Twitter profile picture Sexual Health. Instagram profile picture Sexual Health. Facebook Cover Image Sexual Health. Twitter Cover Image Sexual Health. Films Sexual Health. A4 poster generic male 1 Sexual Health. A4 poster generic male 2 Sexual Health. A4 poster generic female 2 Sexual Health. A4 poster generic female 1 Sexual Health. A4 poster 'get condoms here' male 1 Sexual Health.

A4 poster 'get condoms here' male 2 Sexual Health. A4 poster 'get condoms here' female 1 Sexual Health. Load More. In a recent Public Health England report chlamydia and gonorrhoea were listed as the most common bacterial STIs in England and a priority for prevention. In , , diagnoses of chlamydia and gonorrhoea were made with people aged Leaving an STI untreated can cause serious health issues such as pelvic inflammatory disease, swollen or painful testicles, arthritis, infertility and even meningitis.

Please support our 'Could it be chlamydia? This campaign is aimed at young people who are going on holiday, attending festivals and starting as a fresher. The Good Time Guides share some top tips; creating a P. Toggle navigation. Please find information and resources below for our current campaigns. Safe sex and an inclusive sexual health service February Could it be Chlamydia?