Homosex in ethiopia

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afrol News, 25 March - It is already a crime being homosexual in Ethiopia, but parliament is now making sure the anti-gay laws will be applied in practical life. Ethiopian church groups have called on the government to block a planned visit to the country by a US-based company that organises tours for. Across Ethiopian or according to most Ethiopians, homosexuality is regarded as a white disease and an inexcusable sin.

Addis Ababa, March 20, (kwansei.info) -- I got a lot of response from people who read my article on the book “Yesedom Nefsat.” This book. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in Ethiopia face legal challenges not experienced by non-LGBT residents. Both male and female. Across Ethiopian or according to most Ethiopians, homosexuality is regarded as a white disease and an inexcusable sin.

Addis Ababa, March 20, (kwansei.info) -- I got a lot of response from people who read my article on the book “Yesedom Nefsat.” This book. Ethiopia has become the most oppressive nation towards LGBT people as homosexuality is a crime and discrimination is fostered, enshrining. Across Ethiopian or according to most Ethiopians, homosexuality is regarded as a white disease and an inexcusable sin.






Richard Ammon. A three part commentary by a gay Ethiopian living in South Africa. He tells of threatening conditions and persecution of LGBT people in his native country. The entire homosex of this story are from the highly valuable and useful Pan-African web site Behind the Mask which has useful information about 36 countries on the continent. I want say much about sexual orientation and in addition to this much more about the circumstances of gay people in terms of the law of the country of Ethiopia as well as culture and religion.

Before this I would like introduce you to you some detail about Ethiopia. Ethiopia as large as France and Spain ethiopia, has an area of 1, square kilometer about 65 percent of the land is arable, with 15 percent of presently homosex. There are two seasons, the dry season prevails from October through May, the wet season runs from June to September. Homosex population is estimated at 55 million, over 50 percent of whom are ethiopia 20 years old. The average number of inhabitants per square kilometer in About topography, Ethiopia has an elevated central plateau varying in height between 2, and 3, metres.

In the north and central parts of the country there are some 25 mountains whose peaks rise over 4, metres. The famous Ethiopian river, the Blue Homosex, runs a distance of 1, Kim from its source in lake tanner, to join the white Nile at Khartoum in Sudan.

About economy of Ethiopia, it is one of the poorest countries in the world; about 90 percent of the population earn their living from the land, mainly as subsistence farmers.

Agriculture is the backbone of the economy and the principal export from this sector are coffee, oilseeds, pulses, flowers, vegetable, sugar and food stuffs from animals. There is also a thriving livestock sector, exporting cattle on the hoof and hides as well as skins.

In terms of language and scripture, Ethiopian has got their own alphabetical scripture in addition to a multi-ethnic state with a great variety of languages spoken in the country, of which there are 83 with dialects. The main languages are Ethiopia, Tigrigna and Oromigna, English is not homosex spoken.

There are several religions. The main one is Islam from 50 to 55 percent, Orthodox or Coptic Church makes up 45 to 50 percent, others like, Catholic and Protestant Christians make up 5 to 7 percent of ethiopia population. This is very nasty. About 40 percent of the people of Ethiopia are Christians, and Christianity is predominant in the north.

The south also contains considerable numbers of animists. Most of the Christian belong to the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, whose 4th Century beginnings came long before Europe accepted Christianity. A further small percentage of the population adheres to traditional and other beliefs, including Judaism. You have to know all this history please. The apparent protest had to so with correcting the religious information about Ethiopia rather than with the gay information presented.

GlobalGayz responded asking for reactions to the gay material but there was no further reply. Now that I have introduced the country I would like to begin my main aim for writing — about gay life or homosexuality in this particular country.

Across Ethiopian or according to most Ethiopians, homosexuality is regarded as a white disease and an inexcusable sin. There are three legal systems in Ethiopia, tribal, religious and state law. Homosexuality or being ethiopia, according to this law, the penalty is often death. So homosexual life is extremely difficult to live openly. Even to mention your sexual orientation is feared.

I think this is how 98 percent people think. If you are lucky, God gives you your partner who will have the same sexual identity. But if you are not lucky, you will be suffering mentally and emotionally until you eventually get one of your own. Do you see how much gay or homosexual life is difficult? I am surprised with one point still now, not one human rights activist from the country or from out side the country ever criticised the government for human rights violations ethiopia abuse in terms of minority freedom and rights.

With my last edition I promised to mention about the discrimination against the gays and lesbians and how their rights are violated in Ethiopia.

In Ethiopia this moment many gays and lesbians are living with intimidation and harassment under state, religious, and tribal law. So some of them cannot explore their sexual orientation freely and openly. But no one from in the above mentioned bodies or organisations blamed the government officially about gays and lesbians and the violation of their rights. In addition, I would like to say some about this sexual orientation issue; this is directly related to social, economic, and political agendas.

Each and every right without sexual rights or freedoms are incomplete. So I want emphasise to Ethiopian gays and lesbians that international human rights commissions must force this government to respect and accept each and every persons rights.

Most political activists in and out of the country criticise the government about human rights, real democracy, free speech and press freedoms, about multi-party and free and fair election.

Especially in this time Addis Ababa University students and teachers protest about academic freedom. These are the current political issues. I tried to mention in the last edition that there are so many gays and lesbians living in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia — but they live undercover, unconfident and in fear. Speaking to fellow Ethiopian gays who live in South Africa I tried to get a picture of life back in Addis — my own experience there being so limited.

One man shared with me his homosex experiences as well as telling me about other gays, lesbians, bisexual and transgender people in Ethiopia. His name is Rush, he is 26 years old, and he came to South Homosex in the last months of He started his gay life when he was 7 years old around his village when he was playing with his friends. And I asked him to share with me about gay people, those who live in Addis. My next question was how can they communicate with each other? Ethiopia there a specific place like, bar or other places like in South Africa?

About places to meet, we had specific places, in addition we could make contact in our home vicinity as well. Can you tell me about the circumstances or major problems for gay and lesbian people in Ethiopia? Do you have any message for your gay friends and for other people who have same sexual orientation? Homosex is the starting point of human rights? Let us see the experience of other developed countries in terms of this question.

They are based on giving respect for differences or identification, for the beginning of democracy and the culture of human rights. The maximum sentence can also be applied when the victim is subjected to acts homosex cruelty or sadism; when the offender transmits a venereal disease although fully aware of being infected with it; when an adult is charged with committing homosexual acts with persons under 15 years of age; or when distress, ethiopia or despair drives the victim to committing suicide.

Homosexuality in Ethiopia Richard Ammon.

Two straight boys holding hands at the Lake Langano beach in Ethiopia. It is the Ethiopian council of ministers that has adopted a change to the country's "Pardon and Amnesty law", which will assure that homosexuality, along with terrorism and a few other serious crimes, will become a criminal assault that can no longer be pardoned.

The Ethiopian penal code already defines sexual relations between persons of the same sex as a serious criminal offence. Article of the penal code foresees that sexual minorities are punished hard. Violation of the Ethiopian gay and lesbian sex ban will lead to a minimum incarceration of one year, while it can give up to 15 years of imprisonment. The paragraph is no longer "silent" and is being applied by Ethiopian courts. At the same time, there is a tradition for pardoning and amnesties in Ethiopia.

Imprisoned citizens, including convicted homosexuals, may be pardoned if they have demonstrated a "sincere repentance" for their crimes, in addition to good conduct.

This pardoning must be approved of by the Ethiopian president, who organises a mass pardoning at least once a year. With the new law reform, persons convicted for having had sex with a person of the same sex will be excluded from this possibility of pardoning or amnesties. In Ethiopia and the rest of the Horn, homosexuality is severely condemned — traditionally, religiously and legally — and remains a topic of absolute taboo. In Amharic, the word bushti homosexual is a very offensive insult, implying immorality and depravity.

One traveller wrote to us to report expulsion from a hotel and serious threats just for coming under suspicion. Homosexuality or being gay, according to this law, the penalty is often death.

So homosexual life is extremely difficult to live openly. Even to mention your sexual orientation is feared. I think this is how 98 percent people think. If you are lucky, God gives you your partner who will have the same sexual identity. But if you are not lucky, you will be suffering mentally and emotionally until you eventually get one of your own.

Do you see how much gay or homosexual life is difficult? I am surprised with one point still now, not one human rights activist from the country or from out side the country ever criticised the government for human rights violations or abuse in terms of minority freedom and rights.

With my last edition I promised to mention about the discrimination against the gays and lesbians and how their rights are violated in Ethiopia. In Ethiopia this moment many gays and lesbians are living with intimidation and harassment under state, religious, and tribal law. So some of them cannot explore their sexual orientation freely and openly. But no one from in the above mentioned bodies or organisations blamed the government officially about gays and lesbians and the violation of their rights.

In addition, I would like to say some about this sexual orientation issue; this is directly related to social, economic, and political agendas. Each and every right without sexual rights or freedoms are incomplete. So I want emphasise to Ethiopian gays and lesbians that international human rights commissions must force this government to respect and accept each and every persons rights. Most political activists in and out of the country criticise the government about human rights, real democracy, free speech and press freedoms, about multi-party and free and fair election.

Especially in this time Addis Ababa University students and teachers protest about academic freedom. These are the current political issues. I tried to mention in the last edition that there are so many gays and lesbians living in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia — but they live undercover, unconfident and in fear.

Speaking to fellow Ethiopian gays who live in South Africa I tried to get a picture of life back in Addis — my own experience there being so limited. One man shared with me his sexual experiences as well as telling me about other gays, lesbians, bisexual and transgender people in Ethiopia.