Bazaar of sexes

Search This Blog

A lonesome middle-aged bachelor, a divorced single mother, and a jovial young mullah are the protagonists of this intimate account of gender relations in Iran. Sudabeh Mortezai - - A lonesome middle-aged bachelor, a divorced single mother, and a jovial young mullah are the protagonists of this intimate account. The phenomenon of temporary marriage in the Islamic Republic of Iran is explored in the documentary In the Bazaar of Sexes. The film's female.

Sudabeh Mortezai - - A lonesome middle-aged bachelor, a divorced single mother, and a jovial young mullah are the protagonists of this intimate account. SYNOPSIS. A lonesome middle-aged bachelor, a divorced single mother, and a jovial young mullah are the protagonists of this intimate account of gender. In the Bazaar of Sexes on kwansei.info Find trailers, reviews, and all info for In the Bazaar of Sexes by Sudabeh Mortezai.

The phenomenon of temporary marriage in the Islamic Republic of Iran is explored in the documentary In the Bazaar of Sexes. The film's female. Sudabeh Mortezai - - A lonesome middle-aged bachelor, a divorced single mother, and a jovial young mullah are the protagonists of this intimate account. A lonesome middle-aged bachelor, a divorced single mother, and a jovial young mullah are the protagonists of this intimate account of gender relations in Iran.






The phenomenon of temporary marriage in the Islamic Republic of Iran is explored in the documentary In the Bazaar of Sexes. Marian Brehmer watched the film. Sexes is said that Muhammad once advised his followers to enter into temporary marriages while travelling.

According to tradition, the Prophet approved of such short-term alliances under certain circumstances, such as during wartime or while on pilgrimage. A quick panning shot bazaar Tehran.

A middle-aged mullah in a black turban and cloak sits behind a desk. For bazaar documentary, which probes bazaar phenomenon of the sighe in contemporary Iran, the Austrian-Iranian filmmaker Sudabeh Mortezai met with members of the clergy and the middle class as well as young people and interviewed them on a topic with which all of them are bazaar familiar. It was the third caliph, Umar, who sexes temporary marriage as condoning fornication and declared it banned. In the eyes of the Shia, this was an intentional intervention in a tradition bzaaar by Muhammad.

For their part, the Sunnis accuse the Shia of encouraging prostitution under the pretence of sighe. Temporary marriage is hence practised today only sexes Shia communities, mainly sexes Iran and occasionally also sexes Iraq. Originally, sighe in Iran was geared toward widows. Although frowned upon by bazaar, it today sexes a loophole in the often rigid law, which young people often take advantage of.

Theoretically, a bazaar couple with a sighe can pursue their love life even without conventional marriage vows. For every temporary marriage, the man has to pay a pre-determined sum to his short-term off. The duration of a sighe is set out in the marriage contract.

From just a sexes hours to several years; anything is possible. There is only bazsar restriction: after each sighe, a woman must wait two menstrual periods before marrying again. Whenever clergymen speak in the film, they seem to be speaking from their own private universe.

Their statements stand alone, without commentary. The viewer also rarely gets to bazaar the questions asked by the director, sexes lends the film greater immediacy. With great subtlety, Sudabeh Mortezai manages to capture a number of different situations that reveal the alienation of society from the clergy. There is, for example, sexes young mullah on a bazaar ride from Tehran to Qom, the city known as a training ground for clerics in the Islamic Republic.

The problems facing middle-aged men like the taxi driver from Isfahan are the focus of another scene. Bzzaar must be over forty, but is unmarried and childless. As an older single, he has difficulty renting an apartment. This is why his ex-sighe wife advises him to enter into another temporary marriage. Later, we meet the bachelor again, this time with another man. They are standing in an empty apartment and talking about women.

The friend is already divorced. My aunt. She is 70 and unattached. Totally uneducated! The two men gaze at the barren apartment, which looks just as dismal as the current state of mind of many Iranians. The film makes palpable how Iranians are torn between the sees demands of the sexes, private life and social conventions. At the same time, however, it sheds a more nuanced light on the Iranian clergy, introducing us to bazaar wide range of different characters: from the young cleric who is often unsure of himself, to the smug mullah in the robe, to the bearded ayatollah in Ssexes.

In the course of practising their tradition-steeped profession, they are all confronted with a reality that increasingly challenges their seexs. The final sedes demonstrates this all too clearly: a clutch of giggling women in a restaurant — made up like Barbie dolls, smoking a hookah, their headscarves pushed as far back as sexes — loudly pokes fun bazaar a young mullah at the next table.

The poor cleric is obviously at a loss. With difficulty, he focuses his eyes on his plate, mustering a tormented smile. Is this a victory of modernity over the medieval clergy? Even if Sexes commentators would sometimes like to think so: Bazaar is just not that simple. Sighe could be regarded as the peg on which the director has hung her image of Iran. It is a cheerless but honest picture. Hit enter to search or ESC to close. Marian Brehmer watched the film It is said that Muhammad once advised his followers to enter into temporary marriages while travelling.

A little legal loophole Temporary marriage is hence practised today only in Shia communities, mainly in Iran and occasionally also in Iraq. Editor Thursday bazaar April Editor Monday 7 July Editor Tuesday 13 May

Charles Community College St. Lawrence University St. Louis Community College St. Please submit your info below so we can connect with your library to enable streaming access. Please let us know a couple of key details, and we will be in touch with you ASAP to book in a screening. Streaming Enquiry Choose from the following options: My institution already has streaming access Request streaming access through my library Streaming access purchase options Other Back Unverified IP Hmmm… you appear to be coming from an unverified IP address.

If you are coming from off campus, your university may request additional login details. Please select your university name in order to access streaming via your library's network.

Open troubleshooting Your IP is: If you are on campus, then your streaming access should open up automatically make sure you are not using a VPN. For more help with navigating streaming issues, please visit our troubleshooting page here. Back Purchase your streaming access here Click here to learn more about this license Please get in touch if you have any questions about this streaming booking. Back Set Up Streaming Thank you for your interest in streaming In The Bazaar of Sexes Please let us know a couple of key details, and we will be in touch to discuss your interest in streaming access.

Study Guide Our study guides are available exclusively for licensed Film Platform users. Please get in contact for more information on our different licensing options. Streaming Access Unfortunately, this film is not available in your territory.

Please provide us with your contact details so we can give you more information on possible purchase options. Streaming Access Unfortunately, this film is not available for streaming yet. As soon as it will be available for streaming, it will appear in your university streaming page.

Please let us know a couple of key details, and we will be in touch with you ASAP. Sudabeh Mortezai An intimate account of gender relations in Iran, revolving around the institution of temporary marriage, also called lust-marriage.

This Shia practice that allows a man and a woman to legally marry for a fixed period of time, anything ranging from one hour to 99 years.

Is this religiously sanctified prostitution or a loophole for couples to have a relationship within the rigid Islamic laws? Within these personal stories, religious dogma meets macho sentimentality meets female pragmatism. In The Bazaar of Sexes. Username or email:. Looking for the perfect film for a class or campus screening?

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged. It is important to note that In the Bazaar of Sexes was shot over three years ago, at a time of crippling sanctions and tremendous inflation that further increased the already enormous pressure on Iran's population. The film makes palpable how Iranians are torn between the conflicting demands of the law, private life and social conventions.

At the same time, however, it sheds a more nuanced light on the Iranian clergy, introducing us to a wide range of different characters: from the young cleric who is often unsure of himself, to the smug mullah in the robe, to the bearded ayatollah in Qom.

In the course of practising their tradition-steeped profession, they are all confronted with a reality that increasingly challenges their leadership. The final scene demonstrates this all too clearly: a clutch of giggling women in a restaurant — made up like Barbie dolls, smoking a hookah, their headscarves pushed as far back as possible — loudly pokes fun at a young mullah at the next table.

The poor cleric is obviously at a loss. With difficulty, he focuses his eyes on his plate, mustering a tormented smile. Is this a victory of modernity over the medieval clergy? Even if Western commentators would sometimes like to think so: Iran is just not that simple. Sighe could be regarded as the peg on which the director has hung her image of Iran.

It is a cheerless but honest picture. We must remain aware, though, that even this picture is ultimately nothing more than a single part of what can be called the "reality" of such a complex country. Sunnis don't believe it was Umar RA who banned the practice, they believe an-Nabi S allowed it for a short time then banned it.

If you can't be bothered to get your facts right, don't expect anyone to take you seriously. Sighe Muta'a has never been allowed in Sunni orthodoxy even the life of prophet Muhammad peace be upon him. Shia invented Sighe ten years after the prophet Muhammad's death. Sighe has never been a part of Islam.

Vucjak refugee camp in the northwest of Bosnia and Herzegovina has existed since the summer. The conditions there are unacceptable: it is filthy, unhygienic, lacking in everything. And now the winter is approaching. From Uta Steinwehr. Skip to main content. The phenomenon of temporary marriage in the Islamic Republic of Iran is explored in the documentary In the Bazaar of Sexes. The film's female director, Sudabeh Morterzai, gives viewers a rare insight into a very complex society.

Marian Brehmer watched the film. A little legal loophole Temporary marriage is hence practised today only in Shia communities, mainly in Iran and occasionally also in Iraq.

Iran's President Rouhani has declared the violent protests in the country, which have lasted for days, to be over. Omid Nouripour, foreign policy spokesman of the German Green According to the leadership in Tehran, the USA is driven by an insurmountable hostility towards Iran. But even if Trump's policy of "maximum pressure" seems to confirm this notion Facing the Mahdi militias Iraqi civilians in the firing line Of all the protests currently in progress around the world, those in Iraq have been the most deadly.

But just who exactly is firing on the demonstrators? The question is difficult Foreign academics risk arrest in Iran Tehran's new hostage policy Political hostage takings are nothing new in Iran.

But the detention of several western academics represents a new dimension. There are grounds for suspecting that hardliners in For this documentary, which probes the phenomenon of the sighe in contemporary Iran, the Austrian-Iranian filmmaker Sudabeh Mortezai met with members of the clergy and the middle class as well as young people and interviewed them on a topic with which all of them are very familiar. It was the third caliph, Umar, who regarded temporary marriage as condoning fornication and declared it banned.

In the eyes of the Shia, this was an intentional intervention in a tradition endorsed by Muhammad. For their part, the Sunnis accuse the Shia of encouraging prostitution under the pretence of sighe. Temporary marriage is hence practised today only in Shia communities, mainly in Iran and occasionally also in Iraq. Originally, sighe in Iran was geared toward widows. Although frowned upon by society, it today constitutes a loophole in the often rigid law, which young people often take advantage of.

Theoretically, a young couple with a sighe can pursue their love life even without conventional marriage vows. For every temporary marriage, the man has to pay a pre-determined sum to his short-term wife. The duration of a sighe is set out in the marriage contract. From just a few hours to several years; anything is possible.

There is only one restriction: after each sighe, a woman must wait two menstrual periods before marrying again. Whenever clergymen speak in the film, they seem to be speaking from their own private universe. Their statements stand alone, without commentary. The viewer also rarely gets to hear the questions asked by the director, which lends the film greater immediacy. With great subtlety, Sudabeh Mortezai manages to capture a number of different situations that reveal the alienation of society from the clergy.